Archives For Links

C.S Lewis Doodle  is one of the best – if not the only – YouTube channel for visualising the writings of C.S Lewis. Each video rests more on the rare art of artistic exposition, than on an entertaining artistic expression of Lewis’ thought, and they work.

Powered by the voice of narrator, Ralph Cosham, the artistry and attention to detail which goes into producing these short videos are of an indisputable, very high quality. They are useful as a visual-aid, helping to unpack the depth of meaning, intent and context of selected material from Lewis’ many works.

I had recommended these just over a year ago and I am more than happy to do so again.

Kalman Kingsley, is the chief illustrator and has added some new material since then. So, if you’ve got a few minutes spare, they’re well worth your time.

‘The very idea of freedom presupposes some objective moral law which overarches rulers and ruled alike. Subjectivism about values is eternally incompatible with democracy. We and our rulers are of one kind so long as we are subject to one law.
But if there is no Law of Nature, the ethos of any society is the creation of its rulers, educators and conditioners; and every creator stands above and outside his own creation.’
– (C.S Lewis, ‘The Poison of Subjectivism’ in ‘Christian Reflections‘)

 

 

Five links_Jpeg

Some time has passed since I’ve linked some of the great articles I come across.

So I decided to end the weekend by sharing a few. Should you get the chance, I recommend taking the time to browse their archives .

1). Walter wrote Context is Everything in February stating that

 ‘it is a dangerous thing to interpret God’s word out of context’.

His words reminded me of the many times I would hear the words ‘context is everything’ as I studied.

2). Those annoying Christians: Jenny raised some interesting points about Christians who seem to place appearance over-against substance.

”It seems very manipulative and arrogant to use God’s name to get someone to feel or do something.  It doesn’t even matter what you say after those words, simply by using them, it sets a wall up and discredits whatever you say. It’s especially awful to say “It is God’s will” after something unfortunate happens to make them feel better.  We need to be careful with those words, perhaps only saying them after scriptures and not human events.”

3). 5 Blogging, Publishing, & Writing Misconceptions: Katie’s article highlights some insights from her experiences as a published writer and seasoned blogger. Of special interest is Katies conclusion, stated under Misconception #5 – To be a successful blogger, I just need to write:

“Writing is a very small part of what makes a successful blogger/author/writer… so I’ve learned.Blogging is a community.” 

4). More and Mores (and Morays): In assessing the concepts of natural and unnatural within the context of social constructs, Scott asserts that

“the equating of what is natural with what is acceptable completely misses the point of what morality is. I must make the observation here that moral behavior is always at odds with our “natural” tendencies – that’s precisely WHY moral behavior is revered and respected!  Call me Master-of-the-Obvious, but isn’t the reason we value truth-telling precisely because we know we all have a natural tendency to lie?…By definition, moral behavior is not natural. If anything, I’d say it’s…well, kind of…supernatural”.

5).Christ has witnesses outside the Church: Kevin posted some sound quotes discussing a little bit about Barth’s rejection of ‘natural theology[i]‘ , and it’s relationship to the visible and invisible Church. As I wrote in the comments, I came across a ”hint” of this in my recent reading of CD.1.2:181 where Barth discusses the ”Virgin Birth” and those who deny it. e.g.: ”It is within God’s counsel and will to make this possible, just as it cannot be at all impossible for Him to bring anyone to the knowledge of Himself even beyond the sphere of the Church visible to us”.. The key to understanding the ‘hints’, for me at least, is in his words: ”beyond the sphere of the Church visible to us”.


[i] i.e.: human attempts to reach the God, which inadvertently misses the fact that he reached, reaches and is reaching out to us.